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MOVING ESSENTIALS

Updated: Nov 12, 2019






I wish that I had read the below article before moving into our home. It would have saved so many extra trips to Home Depot. When you have a thousand things on your mind, and a large list, some of the more important essentials, like those listed below, would not have slipped by. Even the other day when we were working at the rental property, Lauren ended up standing on a chair with wheels, while my dad and me took turns on the ladder trying to install a new light fixture. Two ladders in this case would have been great rather than risking a trip to the ER!


Here is what the article said that you need when moving, or if you are already in your house, you should have these items as well:


#1 Wet-Dry Vacuum

You're gonna be spilling stuff. Look for a wet-dry vacuum that can handle everything from paint to nails and small stones.





#2 (The Right) Fire Extinguisher

Before going out and buying the first extinguisher you see, check out the U.S. Fire Administration's guide. There are five different types of fire extinguishers with different uses, from extinguishing cooking oils to wood and paper. Choose the best type or types for your home.


#3 Extension Cord Organizer

Homeownership seems to breed extension cords that grow into a tangled nest. Save yourself time and hassle, and splurge on one of several cord management devices. Or make your own with a pegboard, hooks, and velcro straps to keep each cord loop secure. Either way, your cords will be knot-free and easy to find. And be sure to include a heavy-duty extension cord in your organizer that's outdoor-worthy. You don't want to really have to use that fire extinguisher.


#4 Big-Kid Tools

Odds are you already own a bunch of the basics: drill, screwdriver, hammer, level, tape measure, wrench, pliers, staple gun, utility knife, etc. But homeownership may require a few new ones you might not have needed before, including a:


· Stud finder - You can make as many holes in the walls as you want now. Use the stud finder to figure out where to hang those heavy shelves so they're safely anchored.

· Hand saw - Much easier (and cheaper!) than a power saw, and you can get a good cross-cut saw for smooth edges on small DIY projects.

· Ratchet set - Every bolt in your new house belongs to you, so you'd better be able to loosen and tighten them when needed. Crank that ratchet to get to spots where you can't turn a wrench all the way around. Great for when you're stuck in a corner.

· Pry bar - Get one with a clawed end to pull nails and a flat end to separate drywall, remove trim or molding, and separate tile.


#5 Tool Kit

You'll need something to carry all those tools around from project to project. Create a tool carrier using a tool bucket liner and an old 5-gallon bucket. Or invest in a handyman belt filled with the basics to keep on hand in the kitchen.


#6 Headlamp

Take that flashlight out of your mouth and work hands-free. From switching out a faucet to figuring out what's making that clicking noise behind the washer, there are plenty of homeowner tasks that require both hands and a little artificial light.


#7 Emergency Preparedness Kit

FEMA has a great list of supplies you should have in your kit, including cash, food, water, infant formula and diapers, medications, a flashlight, batteries, first aid kit, matches, sleeping bags, and a change of clothing. The agency recommends you stock enough for every member of your household, including pets, for at least 72 hours.




#8 Ladder(s!)

But not just any old ladder. Consider:

· How high you need to go. If you use an extension ladder for a sky-high job, school yourself on safety tips, such as not standing above the support point.

· Where you'll use it. Make sure all four legs on a stepladder rest safely on a flat area. A straight ladder must be set up at a safe angle, so if a ceiling is too low, it might be too long for the room.

· How heavy-duty it is. Check the ladder's duty rating so you know how much weight (you, your tools, paint cans, etc.) it'll support.

- And don't forget about the all-important escape ladder. The Red Cross recommends them for sleeping areas in multistory homes.


#9 Confidence

Especially for first-time home buyers. You're inheriting the responsibilities a landlord would have if you were renting,. Mowing isn't a big deal, but maybe fixing a shingle or changing a faucet is. But with a little self-confidence — and some YouTube tutorials — there's (almost) no DIY project you can't master.


I totally agree with the last part. Having owned a home for several years now has forced me to learn new skills, and I have picked up even more skills with the rental property, so I am learning more all the time. It's a great feeling when you can accomplish something on your own and not have to always rely on others!




Source: excerpt from House Logic

Laura Flynn, Real Estate Broker

Coldwell Banker

Downers Grove, IL

5114 Main Street

Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of the company.

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